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Continuity of Care

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Infusible MS medications work best in younger patients

Infusible MS medications work best in younger patients

Infusible disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) are disproportionately more effective at quelling disease activity than oral drugs in younger patients, an advantage that fades by about age 45 years, Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD, reported at the annual congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis.

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New technology senses patient activity

New technology senses patient activity

Sheila DeMelle was diagnosed at age 17 with multiple sclerosis. For most of her life, her MS didn’t slow her down too much. “My disability was invisible. I knew I had it; I knew the symptoms,” but her symptoms weren’t readily apparent.

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When MS affects sex and intimacy

When MS affects sex and intimacy

At first, Seattle-area resident Kellen Prouse blamed himself when sex became an ordeal after he was diagnosed with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. “I’m 27, and I’m saying, ‘What is wrong?’ It was hard to admit it was part of MS at first.”

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Sharing decisions, engaging patients

Sharing decisions, engaging patients

Patient engagement in one’s disease management has long been hailed across specialties and chronic disease states as a key to better outcomes and care experiences. But what does it mean for multiple sclerosis specifically?

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